Transforming Hard and Soft Wheat into Refined Flour

The CD1 Mill instrument from Chopin Technology is ideal for the production of refined wheat flours.

Preparing for Testing

Before starting the milling process, it is important to check that the two plastic bins intended to collect bran and shorts are empty and correctly positioned at each end of the mill. The magnetic feed chute must also be positioned on the breaking hopper.

A test requires a sample of wheat - typically 800 g in weight. This wheat must first have been cleaned to ensure it is free of any foreign bodies likely to alter the quality of the milling or damage the instrument, for example, straw, broken grain, foreign seeds, stones or metallic parts.

The wheat must also have been tempered to facilitate the separation of the bran and the flour. Conventionally, wheat moisture is raised to 16% by adding water, and the wheat is left to stand for 24 hours.

Beginning the Test

To begin the test, the user must turn the knob controlling the breaking part to the right. The machine will turn on, and the wheat sample can be poured into the hopper through the feed chute. Here, wheat grains are crushed as they pass between three grooved cylinders, and the resulting ground material is sieved using a centrifugal sieve.

Once the last grain has passed, it is advisable to wait around 3 minutes to ensure the sifting is finished before switching off the instrument. This process will yield three different products: breaking flour, middlings and brans.

Continuing the Milling Process

The second step of the milling is focused on reducing middlings. To do this, users must turn the left knob clockwise. This will cause the instrument to start up, allowing the users to pour any middlings obtained during the breaking into the left hopper.

Here, the middlings are reduced between two smooth cylinders and sieved in a rotary sieve. Once the last grain of middling has passed, it is advisable to wait around 3 minutes to let the sifting end before stopping the machine. This process results in two new products: reduction flour and shorts.

Completing the Test

The milling is now complete. The next step is to combine and homogenize the two obtained flour types: breaking and reductions.

Once the test is complete, cleaning is simple. This process consists of emptying the content of the various product collection bins and returning these boxes to the instrument.

How to Transform Hard and Soft Wheat into Refined Flour for Testing

This information has been sourced, reviewed and adapted from materials provided by KPM Analytics.

For more information on this source, please visit KPM Analytics.

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