Satellite-Based Sensors Provide Valuable Data for Pipeline Monitoring, Crop Production, and More

Using satellite-based hyperspectral sensors that can capture images of Earth beyond the visible light we can see with our eyes, startup Orbital Sidekick provides valuable global monitoring services to customers around the world. So far, the company has launched five commercial satellites, two of which went up in March, and has plans to launch a sixth later this year. Co-founder and CEO Dan Katz attributes much of the company’s success to leveraging the International Space Station (ISS) National Laboratory to test its new sensor technology.

View of the NREP through a window in the Japanese Experiment Module, nicknamed Kibō. Image Credit: NASA

Hyperspectral imaging can reveal the presence of specific chemicals and materials in an area, providing important insights into things like pipeline leaks, crop health, wildfire risk, and materials for mining. To test its new hyperspectral sensor technology, Orbital Sidekick launched its sensor to the ISS, where it was installed on the Nanoracks External Platform (NREP) mounted to the exterior of the orbiting laboratory.

An article in the latest issue of Upward, official magazine of the ISS National Lab, tells the story of Orbital Sidekick and what’s possible through research and technology development on the space station. Katz commented on the value of the company’s ISS research in Upward, saying, “It allowed us to focus our resources on what’s really driving value for our company, which is our intelligence platform, analytics engine, and product development for our end user—that’s what’s important for our commercialization effort. The mission was wildly successful and really set the table for everything we’re doing today with our commercial satellites.”

Following its ISS National Lab-sponsored investigation, Orbital Sidekick raised nearly $50 million in investment dollars and signed more than a dozen large energy companies for pipeline monitoring services. The company plans to expand its satellite constellation to include 14 satellites, allowing Orbital Sidekick to monitor millions of miles of pipeline around the globe on a weekly basis.

See how Orbital Sidekick’s space station research was a springboard for the company’s success in the Upward feature, “Sensors, Satellites, and Sidekicks.”

Citations

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    International Space Station National Laboratory. (2024, May 23). Satellite-Based Sensors Provide Valuable Data for Pipeline Monitoring, Crop Production, and More. AZoSensors. Retrieved on June 23, 2024 from https://www.azosensors.com/news.aspx?newsID=15844.

  • MLA

    International Space Station National Laboratory. "Satellite-Based Sensors Provide Valuable Data for Pipeline Monitoring, Crop Production, and More". AZoSensors. 23 June 2024. <https://www.azosensors.com/news.aspx?newsID=15844>.

  • Chicago

    International Space Station National Laboratory. "Satellite-Based Sensors Provide Valuable Data for Pipeline Monitoring, Crop Production, and More". AZoSensors. https://www.azosensors.com/news.aspx?newsID=15844. (accessed June 23, 2024).

  • Harvard

    International Space Station National Laboratory. 2024. Satellite-Based Sensors Provide Valuable Data for Pipeline Monitoring, Crop Production, and More. AZoSensors, viewed 23 June 2024, https://www.azosensors.com/news.aspx?newsID=15844.

Tell Us What You Think

Do you have a review, update or anything you would like to add to this news story?

Leave your feedback
Your comment type
Submit

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.