Strain and Temperature Sensors for Curved Mounting Surfaces (Model DT3715 Series)

Columbia Series DT3716 sensors were developed to precisely monitor both strain and temperature on curved mounting surfaces. These sensors have a DIN standard 1000Ω platinum RTD that delivers precise temperature measurements at the exact site of sensor attachment, in addition to the precision, robustness and easy installation of the flight-qualified Series DTD2684 sensors.

Similar sensors have been used to monitor the expansion of the rocket body. They can also be used in several military and industrial applications that involve explosive body applications, pipe expansion measurement, aircraft surface load and all other types of engine monitoring.

Series DT3715 sensors are tailor-made to calculate circumferential strain near the diameter of the surface on which it is mounted. That particular mounting radius is custom-made into the sensor body to offer a method of controlling operator alignment method in sensor mounting.

There are models available to compensate for typical materials used in aircraft structural manufacturing, as well as for alternative materials as needed. The Columbia Model 5802 Strain Gage Amplifier may additionally power and signal condition the sensors’ strain and temperature outputs.

Note: Exports from the United States are subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and/or the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) authorization procedures.

  • Strain & Temperature Outputs
  • Choice of Cylindrical Mounting Radius
  • Self-Temperature Compensating

Specifications

Operational

Table 1. Source: Columbia Research Laboratories, Inc.

Operational 1 Series DT3715
DC Input Resistance 1000Ω, ±2%
DC Output Resistance 1000Ω, ±2%
Sensitivity 1,025 (±1 %) mV/V/1000 μϵ
Rated Excitation Voltage 10.0 VDC
Linearity ±0.5% Max.
Zero Strain Offset ±0.5 mV/V Max.
Operating Range -3500 to +5000 μϵ
Sensitivity Shift ±0.005% / °F
Hysteresis, Repeatability ±0.013% Max.
Zero Shift ±0.00025 mV/V/°F Typ.
Creep <0.5%, 5 Min. @ 5000 μϵ
Temperature Sensor Platinum RTD, 1000Ω @ 0 °C DIN EN 60751, Class 2B (0.3 mA Max. Current)

 

Environmental

Table 2. Source: Columbia Research Laboratories, Inc.

Environmental 2 Series DT3715
Temperature Range -54° to +125 °C
Vibration 30 g, 10 Hz to 2 KHz
Humidity MIL-STD-202 Method 103B
Salt Spray MIL-STD-202 Method 101D (168 Hours)
Insulation Resistance 100 Meg. min @ 500 VDC
Dielectric Strength 1050 VRMS, 60 Hz, 1 Min.
Altitude Sea Level to 70,000 Ft.
Shock 100 g, 11 mSec
Flammability MIL-STD-202 Method 111A
Fluids Resistance to short term exposure to fuel, lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids

 

Physical

Table 3. Source: Columbia Research Laboratories, Inc.

Physical Series DT3715
Size 0.562"Sq (Thickness Varies w/ Specified Mounting Radius)
Encapsulation Silicone Rubber per MIL-S-23586A Type I, Class 2, Grade A
Weight Approx. 15 gms (Depending on radius selected)
Matrix 0.001" Polyimide
Leads #26AWG, Teflon Ins, SPC, 24" Nom.

 

1 @25 °C. 2 Installed Gage

Schematic Diagram

Strain and Temperature Sensors for Curved Mounting Surfaces (Model DT3715 Series)

Image Credit: Columbia Research Laboratories, Inc.

Typical Installation of Old Style Strain Gages. 1. Bolt or rivet removed from assembly; 2. Dummy gage(s) bonded to “Z Tab” of same material as structure; 3. Active gage bonded to structure under test; 4. “Z Tab” mounted to structure with bond or rivet; 5. Strain gage leads interwired and soldered to junction block and 6. Entire unit covered with protective material.

Typical Installation of Old Style Strain Gages. 1. Bolt or rivet removed from assembly; 2. Dummy gage(s) bonded to “Z Tab” of same material as structure; 3. Active gage bonded to structure under test; 4. “Z Tab” mounted to structure with bond or rivet; 5. Strain gage leads interwired and soldered to junction block and 6. Entire unit covered with protective material. Image Credit: Columbia Research Laboratories, Inc.

Installation of Columbia Strain Sensor. 1. Strain Sensor bonded to surface under test; 2. Leads connected to wire harness and 3. Coat sensor and wires with waterproofing material.

Installation of Columbia Strain Sensor. 1. Strain Sensor bonded to surface under test; 2. Leads connected to wire harness and 3. Coat sensor and wires with waterproofing material. Image Credit: Columbia Research Laboratories, Inc.

Ordering Information*

Table 4. Source: Columbia Research Laboratories, Inc.

Model Lead Length Compensating Material
DT3715-1 24" Aluminum 7075-T6 or 7050-T73651, IVD
DT3715-2 24" Steel, AISI 4130 or HP9-4-.20
DT3715-3 24" Titanium TI-6AL-4V Annealed
DT3715-4 24" Carbon/Epoxy MMS 549 Type 1

 

* Mounting Radius Required upon Ordering.

Advantages

  • Twice as much output
  • A higher level of precision
  • No compromise on structural integrity
  • Installation time is reduced
  • Optimal temperature compensation

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